Get access

Vaginal Orgasm Is More Prevalent Among Women with a Prominent Tubercle of the Upper Lip

Authors

  • Stuart Brody PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Social Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK
      Stuart Brody, PhD, School of Social Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE, UK. Tel: +44 141 8494020; Fax: +44 141 8483891; E-mail: stuartbrody@hotmail.com
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rui Miguel Costa MA

    1. School of Social Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Stuart Brody, PhD, School of Social Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE, UK. Tel: +44 141 8494020; Fax: +44 141 8483891; E-mail: stuartbrody@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction.  Recent studies have uncovered multiple markers of vaginal orgasm history (unblocked pelvic movement during walking, less use of immature psychological defense mechanisms, greater urethrovaginal space). Other markers (perhaps of prenatal origin) even without obvious mechanistic roles in vaginal orgasm might exist, and a clinical observation led to the novel hypothesis that a prominent tubercle of the upper lip is such a marker.

Aims.  To examine the hypothesis that a prominent tubercle of the upper lip is associated specifically with greater likelihood of experiencing vaginal orgasm (orgasm elicited by penile–vaginal intercourse [PVI] without concurrent masturbation).

Methods.  Women (N = 258, predominantly Scottish) completed an online survey reporting their frequencies of various sexual activities and corresponding orgasms, age, and the prominence of the tubercle of their upper lip. Social desirability response bias was also assessed.

Main Outcome Measures.  Multivariate associations of lip tubercle prominence with vaginal orgasm (ever and past month consistency) and with orgasm by other means.

Results.  A prominent and sharply raised lip tubercle was associated with greater odds (odds ratio = 12.3) of ever having a vaginal orgasm, and also with greater past month vaginal orgasm consistency (an effect driven by the women who never had a vaginal orgasm), than less prominent lip tubercle categories. Lip tubercle was not associated with social desirability responding, or with orgasm triggered by masturbation during PVI, solitary or partner clitoral or vaginal masturbation, vibrator, or cunnilingus.

Conclusions.  The results are discussed in light of the unique nature of vaginal orgasm and the possibility of prenatal developmental influences. Brody S and Costa RM. Vaginal orgasm is more prevalent among women with a prominent tubercle of the upper lip. J Sex Med 2011;8:2793–2799.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary