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ATTACHMENT PERSPECTIVES ON DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND FAMILY LAW

Authors

  • Alicia Lieberman,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of California San Francisco Department of Psychiatry
      Alicia.Lieberman@ucsf.edu; czeanah@tulane.edu; mcintosh@familytransitions.com.au
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  • Charles Zeanah,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Tulane University School of Medicine
      Alicia.Lieberman@ucsf.edu; czeanah@tulane.edu; mcintosh@familytransitions.com.au
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  • Jennifer McIntosh

    Corresponding author
    1. Melbourne
      Alicia.Lieberman@ucsf.edu; czeanah@tulane.edu; mcintosh@familytransitions.com.au
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Alicia.Lieberman@ucsf.edu; czeanah@tulane.edu; mcintosh@familytransitions.com.au

Abstract

Lieberman and Zeanah are specialist clinicians, researchers, and prolific publishers in the areas of infant mental health, attachment development in high-risk environments, and treatment of infant–parent relationship trauma. In this article, Lieberman and Zeanah discuss the impacts of domestic violence on the attachment security and development of infants and children and address a number of implications for the family law context. Conundrums for parenting visitation and living arrangements are considered, together with the need for multidisciplinary, early response and the pivotal role of family courts in directing this response.

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