The management of urogynaecological problems in pregnancy and the early postpartum period

Authors

  • Fida Asali MSc MRCOG,

    Assistant Professor in Obstetrics and Gynaecology/Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist
    1. Faculty of Medicine, The Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan
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  • Ismaiel Mahfouz MSc MRCOG,

    Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist
    1. Jordan Healthcare Centre, Amman, Jordan
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  • Christian Phillips DM MRCOG

    Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist, Corresponding author
    1. Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital, Basingstoke, Hants, UK
    • Faculty of Medicine, The Hashemite University, Zarqa, Jordan
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Correspondence: Christian Phillips. Email: phillipschaps@aol.com

Abstract

Key content

  • Lower urinary tract infection is associated with increased maternal and fetal morbidity.
  • There is an association between pelvic organ prolapse and increasing parity and vaginal deliveries.
  • Lower urinary tract dysfunction and pelvic organ prolapse are common during pregnancy and the postpartum period, but often resolve.
  • Special consideration is needed regarding the management of lower urinary tract dysfunction and pelvic organ prolapse during pregnancy and the postpartum period, with an emphasis on conservative management.

Learning objectives

  • To know how to manage lower urinary tract infection in pregnancy.
  • To understand the epidemiology and management of lower urinary tract dysfunction in pregnancy.
  • To be aware of the epidemiology and management of pelvic organ prolapse in pregnancy.

Ethical issues

  • Should pregnant women be prescribed antimuscarinic drugs when adverse effects on the fetus have been shown in animal studies?
  • Should women who have not completed their families be offered surgery for pelvic organ prolapse?
  • Should elective caesarean section be offered to women who have had previous successful incontinence surgery?

Ancillary