A parent-directed portion education intervention for young children: Be Beary Healthy

Authors

  • Leigh Small PhD, RN, PNP-PC, FNAP,

    Associate Professor, Center for Improving Health Outcomes in Children, Teens, and Families, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Corresponding author
    • Center for Improving Health Outcomes in Children, Teens, and Families, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona
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  • Darya Bonds-McClain PhD,

    Associate Research Professor
    1. Center for Improving Health Outcomes in Children, Teens, and Families, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona
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  • Linda Vaughan PhD, RD,

    Director
    1. School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona
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  • Bernadette Melnyk PhD, RN, CPNP/PMHNP, FNAP, FANN,

    Dean of the College of Nursing and Associate Vice President for Health Promotion and Chief Wellness Officer
    1. College of Nursing, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
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  • Alex Gannon BS,

    MPH Candidate, Research Assistant and Instructional Aide
    1. School of Letters and Sciences, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
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  • Sharon Thompson BS

    Graduate Student Researcher
    1. College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA
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  • Acknowledgements

    We wish to acknowledge the funding support to the first author by the Center for Improving Health Outcomes in Children, Teens, and Families for completion of this project. We would also like to acknowledge the editorial support provided by Nancy Moore.

  • Disclosure: The authors report no actual or potential conflicts of interest.

Author contact

Leigh.Small@asu.edu, with a copy to the Editor: roxie.foster@UCDenver.edu

Abstract

Purpose.

This pilot study aimed to determine the effects of an intervention on nutrition knowledge, food parents serve, and children's dietary intake.

Design and Methods.

A single-group pre-/posttest design was used with 45 mothers and their 4- to 6-year-old children. After pretesting, parents received child nutrition information and portion-related activities.

Results.

Paired samples t-tests revealed that from pre- to posttest the average calories mothers served and the average calories children ate significantly decreased (medium effect size). Medium effects also were recognized from pre- to posttest for the carbohydrates served and carbohydrates consumed. No significant change was found in parents' nutrition knowledge.

Practice Implications.

Interventions focusing on skill building rather than on increasing knowledge may more effectively lead to changed child intake.

Ancillary