Prevalence of Negative Birth Perception, Disaffirmation, Perinatal Trauma Symptoms, and Depression Among Postpartum Women

Authors

  • Dianna Spies Sorenson PhD, RN, CNS,

    1. Dianna Spies Sorenson, PhD, RN, CNS, is a Hildegard E. Peplau Scholar in private practice, and Lois Tschetter, EdD, RN, IBCLC, is an Associate Professor, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA.
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  • Lois Tschetter EdD, RN, IBCLC

    1. Dianna Spies Sorenson, PhD, RN, CNS, is a Hildegard E. Peplau Scholar in private practice, and Lois Tschetter, EdD, RN, IBCLC, is an Associate Professor, College of Nursing, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, USA.
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Author contact: drdianna@sio.midco.net, with a copy to the Editor: gpearson@uchc.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE.  This study documented new case and estimated annual case prevalence, and relationships among women's negative birth perceptions, provider disaffirmation, perinatal trauma symptoms, and depression at 6–7 months postpartum.

DESIGN AND METHODS.  An exploratory investigation of 71 White women (20.8% of the total population) was conducted.

CONCLUSIONS.  New case prevalence of negative birth perceptions (9.6:100), perinatal trauma symptoms (10.2:100), disaffirmation (8.6:100), and depression (15.7:100) are greater than other prominent high burden diseases. Variables were significantly correlated.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.  Findings reinforce the need for psychiatric liaison advanced practice nurses caring for childbearing women, including roles for detection/screening, educating professionals in communication, legislative/advocacy for funding, and further research.

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