Promoting Positive Developmental Outcomes in Sexual Minority Youth Through Best Practices in Clinic–School Consultation

Authors

  • Amanda J. Hirsch PhD, NCSP,

    1. Amanda J. Hirsch, PhD, NCSP, is Assistant Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John S. Carlson, PhD, NCSP, is Associate Professor of School Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan; Alicia L. Crowl, PhD, is Assistant Professor of School Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
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  • John S. Carlson PhD, NCSP,

    1. Amanda J. Hirsch, PhD, NCSP, is Assistant Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John S. Carlson, PhD, NCSP, is Associate Professor of School Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan; Alicia L. Crowl, PhD, is Assistant Professor of School Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
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  • Alicia L. Crowl PhD

    1. Amanda J. Hirsch, PhD, NCSP, is Assistant Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John S. Carlson, PhD, NCSP, is Associate Professor of School Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan; Alicia L. Crowl, PhD, is Assistant Professor of School Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USA.
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hirscham@pitt.edu, with a copy to the Editor: poster@uta.edu

Abstract

TOPIC:  Educational and healthcare service delivery systems play an important role within the lives of sexual minority youth.

PURPOSE:  To provide justification and recommendations for improving the coordination and collaboration of school-based mental health professionals and child and adolescent psychiatric nurses via presentation of a set of consultation best practices.

SOURCES:  Multidisciplinary literature specific to sexual minority youth, school climate, clinical experience, and consultation practices.

CONCLUSION:  Nurses are in a position to advocate for and provide education about sexual minority youth in schools and to provide direct support to this population. By creating collaborative relationships across clinics and schools, information and expertise can be shared and applied to affect change and lead to positive outcomes for all students.

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