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Articles: Increasing Participation in Prevention Research: Strategies for Youths, Parents, and Schools

Authors

  • Carole Hooven PhD,

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  • Elaine Walsh PhD, RN,

    1. Carole Hooven, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor; Elaine Walsh, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor; Amy Salazar, BA, is Research Coordinator, Reconnecting Youth Prevention Research Program, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health. Mayumi Willgerodt, PhD, MPH, RN, is Associate Professor, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Mayumi Willgerodt PhD, MPH, RN,

    1. Carole Hooven, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor; Elaine Walsh, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor; Amy Salazar, BA, is Research Coordinator, Reconnecting Youth Prevention Research Program, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health. Mayumi Willgerodt, PhD, MPH, RN, is Associate Professor, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • Amy Salazar BA

    1. Carole Hooven, PhD, is Research Assistant Professor; Elaine Walsh, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor; Amy Salazar, BA, is Research Coordinator, Reconnecting Youth Prevention Research Program, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health. Mayumi Willgerodt, PhD, MPH, RN, is Associate Professor, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
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  • This study was funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NR04933), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA10317). The authors gratefully acknowledge the wisdom, support, and training by Dr. Leona Eggert and Ms. Liela Nicholas that was the foundation for the recruitment strategies described in this paper.

chooven@u.washington.edu, with a copy to the Editor: poster@uta.edu

Abstract

TOPIC:  Subject participation is a critical concern for clinicians and researchers involved in prevention programs, especially for intensive interventions that require randomized assignment and lengthy youth and parent involvement.

PURPOSE:  This article describes details of an integrated approach used to recruit and retain at-risk high school youths, their parents, and high schools to two different comprehensive, “indicated” prevention programs.

SOURCES USED:  Parent and youth recruitment and retention data for the two studies is provided in support of the approach described. A coordinated, multilevel approach, organized around cross-cutting issues, is described in detail as a response to the challenges of including vulnerable populations in intervention research.

CONCLUSION:  Methods are relevant to nurse clinicians who deliver prevention programs, and are important to clinical research that relies upon adequate participation in research programs.

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