Experiences of Teaching Nursing in Four Countries

Authors

  • Doris Deedei Khalil, RN, PhD, RM, RNT

    1. Division of Nursing & Midwifery, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925, South Africa.
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  • Doris Deedei Khalil, RN, PhD, RM, RNT, Division of Nursing & Midwifery, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925, South Africa.

Author contact: dkhalil@uctgsh1.uct.ac.za, with a copy to the Editor: cooperconsulting@socal.rr.com

Abstract

This article presents reflections on personal experiences of teaching nursing in the United Kingdom, Ghana, Uganda, and South Africa. The experiences related focus on differences and similarities in institutional cultures, teaching strategies, categories of students, students’ expectations, and learning opportunities. The four institutions could be described as different; yet because of the hierarchical nature of the nursing profession, even within the training or university settings, a new staff member regardless of his/her qualifications and experiences is frequently relegated to the level of a novice. Discussions on some of the challenges facing Ghana and Uganda nursing training institutions and suggestions on possible approaches to address those challenges are presented.

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