Caring Theory and Practice—Entering a Simultaneous Concept Analysis

Authors

  • Albertine Ranheim RN, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Albertine Ranheim, RN, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping;
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  • Anita Kärner RN, MPH, PhD,

    1. Anita Kärner, RN, MPH, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Norrköping; and
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  • Carina Berterö RNT, BSc, MScN, PhD

    1. Carina Berterö, RNT, BSc, MScN, PhD, is Professor, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
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  • We hereby confirm that all three contributing authors approve of this manuscript. All three authors have performed active contribution to the conception, analysis, and interpretation of the manuscript. All three authors have taken a final approval of the submitted manuscript.

Albertine Ranheim, RN, PhD, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping, Sweden. E-mail: tine@jdb.se

Abstract

PROBLEM.  To better understand the approach of caring in nursing and the role of theory in practice, we wanted to consolidate the caring theory of Watson with the empirical findings from the three studies performed to reveal nurses' caring intentions and their lived experience of reflecting caring theory in practice.

METHOD.  Through a simultaneous concept analysis of nine concepts, caring science theory was consolidated with the findings of the three empirical studies to reveal the dynamics of caring theory and caring practice.

FINDINGS AND CONCLUSION.  These nine concepts were found to be interrelated with the advanced concept of mediating care, which emphasizes that mediating care calls for an authenticity of being and ability—an ability to be present to self and others in the dynamism of openness and frames of thought.

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