RELATIONSHIPS AMONG PAY, RACE, SEX, OCCUPATIONAL PRESTIGE, SUPERVISION, WORK AUTONOMY, AND JOB SATISFACTION IN A NATIONAL SAMPLE

Authors


  • 1

    The author expresses his appreciation to the management of the San Antonio College Computer Center for granting access to their computer. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Academic Council of St. Mary's University.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Charles N. Weaver, School of Business and Administration, St. Mary's University, One Camino Santa Maria, San Antonio, Texas 78284.

Abstract

Published evidence, based largely on bivariate methods of analysis, generally suggests that pay, race, occupational prestige, supervisory status, and work autonomy are associated with job satisfaction and that sex is not. Regression analysis of a representative sample of U.S. workers, which partialled out the effects of a number of other variables, affirms that supervisory status makes an independent contribution to job satisfaction and that sex is unrelated, but suggests that the zero-order effects of pay, race, occupational prestige, and work autonomy are spurious.

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