CORRELATES OF PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCE: AN ILLUSTRATION OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL CLIMATE APPROACH TO WORK ENVIRONMENT PERCEPTIONS

Authors


  • Support for this research was provided under Office of Naval Research contract number N00014-77-C-123, Office of Naval Research Contract NR 170-840. Opinions expressed are those of the authors and are not to be construed as necessarily reflecting the official view or endorsement of the Department of the Navy.

  • The authors would like to thank J. R. Bruni, R. P. Crandall, A. P. Jones, S. B. Sells, and J. Schneider for their helpful suggestions and advice.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Lawrence R. James, Institute of Behavioral Research, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas 76129.

Abstract

Correlates of subordinates' perceptions of their psychological influence on supervisors' decisions were examined for 126 subordinates in high technology jobs and 205 subordinates in low technology, production line jobs. Based on the psychological climate perspective of work environment perceptions, it was predicted that perceptions of psychological influence would be related significantly to (a) situational attributes, including supervisor behaviors, (b) individual characteristics, and (c) person by situation interactions. Results supported these assumptions and suggested that a cognitive information processing model assists in explaining environmental perceptions.

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