PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF SELF-APPRAISALS OF JOB PERFORMANCE

Authors

  • GEORGE C. THORNTON III

    Corresponding author
    1. Colorado State University
      Requests for reprints should be sent to George C. Thornton, III, Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523.
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  • An earlier version of this paper was delivered in E. L. Levine, Organizational Applications of Self-Appraisals and Self-Assessment: Another Look, presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August, 1978.

Requests for reprints should be sent to George C. Thornton, III, Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523.

Abstract

This paper reviews literature of psychometric properties of self-appraisals of work performance. It summarizes evidence of leniency, variability, halo, bias, and construct validity. Comparisons with appraisals by supervisors, peers, and subordinates suggest that self-appraisals tend to show more leniency, less variability, and less discriminant validity. Different factor structures have been found among self, supervisor and peer-ratings. On the other hand, self-appraisals showed less halo. Self-appraisals were significantly correlated with other sources in some studies and failed to correlate in many others. Existing data do not allow any conclusion whether the quality of self-appraisals is a function of scale format, amount or rater training, type of judgment, or purpose of appraisal. The effects of the observed psychometric qualities of self-appraisals on various applications are discussed. Problems may exist when they are used for administrative decision making, diagnosis of training needs, applied criterion measurement, measurement of constructs in basic research, or for selection purposes.

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