JOB CLASSIFICATION APPROACHES AND THE IMPLEMENTATION OF VALIDITY GENERALIZATION RESULTS

Authors


  • The research reported here was funded by the American Petroleum Institute. The authors wish to thank the members of the API Subcommittee on Personnel Selection for their efforts and support of this project. The authors also wish to acknowledge the help of Richard Kennah in developing the preliminary inventory used in this study; and Frank Lane and Robin Shealy for helping to prepare the data for analysis.

Requests for reprints should be addressed to Edwin T. Comelius III, College of Business Administration, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, 29208.

Abstract

This paper compares two job classification methods for showing the appropriateness of cognitive tests in settings that were not involved in supplying data for a validity generalization analysis. One approach was an elaborate quantitative procedure that involved a lengthy job inventory and a multivariate item analysis. This approach was shown to be highly successful when applied to the responses from 1179 job inventories collected in 54 petroleum-petrochemical plants from 30 different companies. The other procedure involved simple job classification judgments by supervisors and incumbents. This latter approach was shown to be as effective, but was much less time consuming and costly. Professional and legal implications of these findings are discussed.

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