JOB SATISFACTION, ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT, TURNOVER INTENTION, AND TURNOVER: PATH ANALYSES BASED ON META-ANALYTIC FINDINGS

Authors


  • This research was supported by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (No. 452-90-0432) to R. P. Tfett and (No. 410-89-0379) to J. P. Meyer. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Richard D. Goffin and three anonymous reviewers for their thoughtful comments on earlier versions of the article.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to John P. Meyer, Department of Psychology, Social Science Centre, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5C2, Canada.

Abstract

Cross-study differences in the contributions of work attitudes to the turnover process led us to (a) estimate the six relations among job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention/withdrawal cognitions, and turnover using meta-analysis; (b) assess the effects of several psychometric moderators on those relations; and (c) compare the influences of satisfaction and commitment in the turnover process by applying path analysis to the meta-analytic correlations. Based on aggregations involving a total of 178 independent samples from 155 studies, results showed that (a) satisfaction and commitment each contribute independently to the prediction of intention/cognitions; (b) intention/cognitions are predicted more strongly by satisfaction than by commitment; (c) intention/cognitions mediate nearly all of the attitu-dinal linkage with turnover; and (d) attitudinal contributions to the turnover process vary with the use of single- versus multi-item scales, the 9- versus 15-item version of the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, and turnover intention versus withdrawal cognition scales.

Ancillary