A META-ANALYTIC REVIEW OF ATTITUDINAL AND DISPOSITIONAL PREDICTORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR

Authors


  • The authors gratefully acknowledge the exemplary citizenship behavior of Frank Schmidt, Joe Stauffer, and Mike Burke for making available copies of the programs used by us in the analyses reported here, and wish to express appreciation to three anonymous reviewers for their exceptional professionalism in offering many constructive comments and suggestions.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Dennis W. Organ, School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington IN 47405.

Abstract

A quantitative review of 55 studies supports the conclusion that job attitudes are robust predictors of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). The relationship between job satisfaction and OCB is stronger than that between satisfaction and in-role performance, at least among nonmanagerial and nonprofessional groups. Other attitudinal measures (perceived fairness, organizational commitment, leader supportiveness) correlate with OCB at roughly the same level as satisfaction. Dispositional measures do not correlate nearly as well with OCB (with the exception of conscientiousness). The most notable moderator of these correlations appears to be the use of self- versus other-rating of OCB; self-ratings are associated with higher correlations, suggesting spurious inflation due to common method variance, and much greater variance in correlation. Differences in subject groups and work settings do not account for much variance in the relationships. Implications are noted for theory, practice, and strategies for future research on OCB.

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