THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL-LEVEL ORIENTATION TRAINING PROGRAM IN THE SOCIALIZATION OF NEW HIRES

Authors


  • The authors thank Nancy Campbell, Sondra Clayton, Bob Towner-Larson, Tim Poland, Jennifer Stevens, and Deborah Wasserman for their assistance in conducting this study and John P. Wanous, Georgia T Chao, and the anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. A version of this paper was presented at the Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Dallas, Texas, April 1998.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Howard J. Klein, Department of Management and Human Resources, Max M. Fisher College of Business, The Ohio State University, 2100 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1144; klein.12@osu.edu.

Abstract

This quasi-experimental field study examined the impact of attending a voluntary, organizational-level new employee orientation training program on organizational socialization. Six content dimensions of socialization were measured before and 1 to 2 months following orientation training for a sample of 116 new employees in a variety of occupations. Results revealed that employees attending the orientation training were significantly more socialized on 3 of the 6 socialization content dimensions (goals/values, history, & people) than employees who did not attend the training. Employees attending the orientation training also had significantly higher levels of affective organizational commitment than nonattendees, a relationship that was fully mediated by the socialization content dimensions, primarily goals/values, and history.

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