AGE DIFFERENCES IN TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION DECISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CHANGING WORK FORCE

Authors

  • MICHAEL G. MORRIS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Air Force Institute of Technology
      and requests for reprints should be addressed to Professor Michael G. Morris, Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT/ENV), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433; michael.morris@afit.af.mil.
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  • VISWANATH VENKATESH

    1. University of Maryland
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  • We thank Tracy Ann Sykes of the University of Maryland for her help in improving the readability of the paper and copyediting.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Professor Michael G. Morris, Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT/ENV), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433; michael.morris@afit.af.mil.

Abstract

This research investigated age differences in individual adoption and sustained usage of technology in the workplace using the theory of planned behavior. User reactions and technology usage behavior were studied over a 5-month period among 118 workers being introduced to a new software system. At 2 points of measurement, compared to older workers, younger workers' technology usage decisions were more strongly influenced by attitude toward using the technology. In contrast, older workers were more strongly influenced by subjective norm and perceived behavioral control, although the effect of subjective norm diminished over time. These findings were robust, even after controlling for key confounding variables identified in prior organizational behavior research (i.e., income, occupation, and education levels). Theoretical and practical implications for understanding the effects of aging on technology adoption and usage in the workplace are discussed.

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