SOURCES OF SUPPORT AND EXPATRIATE PERFORMANCE: THE MEDIATING ROLE OF EXPATRIATE ADJUSTMENT

Authors


  • This paper is based on the first author's dissertation. The study was funded in part by the University of Illinois Center for Human Resource Management and in part by the SHRM Foundation Harvey Wilson Doctoral Dissertation Grant. The interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations, however, are those of the authors, and do not necessarily represent those of the funding organizations. We acknowledge Bob Liden, Tom Lumpkin, Rod Shrader, and Len Newman for helpful comments on earlier versions of this paper.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Maria Kraimer, Department of Management and LR, 1860 East 18th Street, College of Business Administration, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH, 44114-3610; m.kraimer@csuohio.edu.

Abstract

This study examined the role of 3 sources of support in facilitating expatriate adjustment and performance. A model was developed that examined the effects of perceived organizational support (POS), leader-member exchange (LMX), and spousal support on expatriates' adjustment to work, the country, and interacting with foreign nationals. In turn, it was expected that expatriate adjustment would influence expatriate task performance and contextual performance. The model was tested using a sample of 213 expatriate-supervisor dyads via structural equation modeling. The results indicated that POS had direct effects on expatriate adjustment, which in turn had direct effects on both dimensions of performance. Although LMX did not influence adjustment, it did have direct effects on expatriate task and contextual performance. Spousal support did not relate to adjustment or performance. Practical implications for facilitating expatriate adjustment and performance are discussed.

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