APPLICANT REACTIONS TO SELECTION: DEVELOPMENT OF THE SELECTION PROCEDURAL JUSTICE SCALE (SPJS)

Authors


  • An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1998 SIOP Annual Conference in Dallas, TX. We thank Carl Maertz for his help with the earlier development of items designed to tap some dimensions of procedural justice in a previous study (Bauer, Maertz, Dolen, &Campion, 1998) and Daniel Kuang, David Ostberg, and Matthew Paronto for their administrative help during this research.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Talya N. Bauer, Portland State University, School of Business Administration, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207; TalyaB@sba.pdx.edu.

Abstract

This paper describes research that fills a void in the applicant reactions literature by developing a comprehensive measure of Gilliland's (1993) procedural justice rules, called the Selection Procedural Justice Scale (SPJS). Five separate phases of scale development were conducted. In Phase 1 we generated and refined the items. For Phase 2 we reduced the items through exploratory factor analysis using data gathered from 330 applicants for the job of court officer and found higher-order factors consistent with Greenberg (1993a, 1993b). In Phase 3 we confirmed the factor structure using a separate sample of 242 applicants and trainees for the court officer job. In Phase 4 we assessed the initial convergent and divergent validity of the scale. In Phase 5 we tested the generalizability of these items in general and for those receiving positive and negative selection outcomes using 2 student samples. The results demonstrated the usefulness of the SPJS in differentiating each of Gilliland's procedural justice rules and relating them to outcomes included in his model of applicant reactions. A copy of the SPJS is included in the Appendix.

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