PREDICTORS OF OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE CAREER SUCCESS: A META-ANALYSIS

Authors


  • An earlier version of this article was presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management and won the Best Paper Award from the Careers Division.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Thomas W.H. Ng, Department of Management, Terry College of Business, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602; twhng@uga.edu.

Abstract

Using the contest- and sponsored-mobility perspectives as theoretical guides, this meta-analysis reviewed 4 categories of predictors of objective and subjective career success: human capital, organizational sponsorship, sociodemographic status, and stable individual differences. Salary level and promotion served as dependent measures of objective career success, and subjective career success was represented by career satisfaction. Results demonstrated that both objective and subjective career success were related to a wide range of predictors. As a group, human capital and sociodemographic predictors generally displayed stronger relationships with objective career success, and organizational sponsorship and stable individual differences were generally more strongly related to subjective career success. Gender and time (date of the study) moderated several of the relationships examined.

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