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A MULTILEVEL INTEGRATION OF PERSONALITY, CLIMATE, SELF-REGULATION, AND PERFORMANCE

Authors


  • This research was supported by the 2004 SIOP Dissertation Scholarship Award and is based on the first author's dissertation, which was chaired by the second author at the Georgia Institute of Technology. We thank the dissertation committee members Jack Feldman, Charles Parsons, Ruth Kanfer, and Henry Moon, for their comments and support. We also thank Bryan Edwards, Ron Landis, and Murray Barrick for their comments and suggestions on previous versions of this manuscript.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to J. Craig Wallace, Department of Management, Spears School of Business, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078-4011, Craig.Wallace@OKState.edu.

Abstract

The purpose of this multilevel study was to test whether regulatory focus mechanisms (promotion focus and prevention focus; Higgins, 1997, American Psychologist, 52, 1280–1300; Higgins, 2000, American Psychologist, 55, 1217–1230) can help explain how group safety climate and individual differences in Conscientiousness relate to individual productivity and safety performance. Results, based on a sample of 254 employees from 50 work groups, showed that safety climate and conscientiousness predicted promotion and prevention regulatory focus, which in turn mediated the relationships of safety climate and Conscientiousness with supervisor ratings of productivity and safety performance. Implications for theory and research on climate, motivation, and performance and avenues for future research are discussed.

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