RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN EMPLOYEE RETENTION: ARE DIVERSITY CLIMATE PERCEPTIONS THE KEY?

Authors


  • A previous version of this article was presented at the 21st Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology, Dallas, Texas May 2006.

and requests for reprints should be addressed to Patrick F. McKay, Sheldon B. Lubar School of Business, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3202 N. Maryland Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0742; pmckay@uwm.edu

Abstract

Given considerable racial differences in voluntary turnover (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006, Table 28), the present study examined the influence of diversity climate perceptions on turnover intentions among managerial employees in a national retail organization. The authors hypothesized that pro-diversity work climate perceptions would correlate most negatively with turnover intentions among Blacks, followed in order of strength by Hispanics and Whites (Hypothesis 1), and that organizational commitment would mediate these interactive effects of race and diversity climate perceptions on turnover intentions
(Hypothesis 2). Results from a sample of 5,370 managers partially supported both hypotheses, as findings were strongest among Blacks. Contrary to the hypotheses, however, White men and women exhibited slightly stronger effects than Hispanic personnel.

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