In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticles for Imaging Applications

Authors

  • Peter E. Petrochenko,

    1. Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
    2. Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, UNC – Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
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  • Qin Zhang,

    1. Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
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  • Haorong Wang,

    1. Sun Innovations Inc, Fremont, CA
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  • Ted Sun,

    1. Sun Innovations Inc, Fremont, CA
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  • Bridget Wildt,

    1. Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
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  • Martha W. Betz,

    1. Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
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  • Peter L. Goering,

    1. Division of Biology, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
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  • Roger J. Narayan

    Corresponding author
    • Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, UNC – Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
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  • Note: The mention of commercial products, their sources, or their use in connection with material reported herein is not to be construed as either an actual or implied endorsement of such products by the Department of Health and Human Services.

roger_narayan@msn.com

Abstract

The in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of commercially available doped YVO4 were evaluated in RAW 264.7 macrophages using the MTT assay. The results indicated that 20–50 nm diameter samarium-doped YVO4 showed significant toxicity at concentrations of 25 μg/mL and higher; samples of the same material functionalized with COOH showed less cytotoxicity. At concentrations of 25–100 μg/mL, 20–50 nm erbium-doped YVO4 showed less toxicity compared with 20–50 nm samarium-doped YVO4. Ten nanometer samples showed no toxicity at concentrations of 100–600 μg/mL. The cytotoxicity of rare earth nanoparticles in macrophages is dependent, at least in part, on size and surface functionalization.

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