The Influence of Hunting on Antipredator Behavior in Central African Monkeys and Duikers

Authors

  • Barbara M. Croes,

    Corresponding author
    1. Smithsonian Institution, Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012, Q-3123 MRC 705, Washington, DC, 20013, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • William F. Laurance,

    1. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Republic of Panamá
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sally A. Lahm,

    1. Institut de Recherche en Ecologie Tropicale, B.P. 180, Makokou, Gabon
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Landry Tchignoumba,

    1. Smithsonian Institution, Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012, Q-3123 MRC 705, Washington, D.C., 20013, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Alfonso Alonso,

    1. Smithsonian Institution, Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012, Q-3123 MRC 705, Washington, D.C., 20013, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michelle E. Lee,

    1. Smithsonian Institution, Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012, Q-3123 MRC 705, Washington, D.C., 20013, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Patrick Campbell,

    1. Smithsonian Institution, Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity Program, National Zoological Park, P.O. Box 37012, Q-3123 MRC 705, Washington, D.C., 20013, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ralph Buij

    1. Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

Corresponding author; Present address: Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands; e-mail: croes_barbara@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Many animals can adjust their behavioral strategies to reduce predation risk. We investigated whether rain forest monkeys and duikers alter their antipredatory behavior in response to hunting by humans in southwestern Gabon. We compared monkey and duiker responses to human observers in an area where hunting is prohibited, to those in a nearby area where hunting pressure is moderate but spatially variable. The results of our study indicate that monkeys become more secretive when hunted, commencing alarm calls only when at a certain distance (typically > 50 m) from humans. We found no difference in monkey group size between hunted and no-hunting areas. In no-hunting areas, duikers often freeze in response to approaching observers, but in hunted areas they abandon this strategy and rapidly flee from humans. Duikers also whistle more often in areas where they are hunted frequently. Our findings have at least two important implications. First, behavioral observations of monkeys and duikers may be useful in gauging local hunting intensity in African rain forests. Second, duiker densities are likely to be overestimated in hunted areas, where they more readily flee and whistle, and underestimated in no-hunting areas, where they rely on freezing behavior to avoid detection. Because behavioral adaptations to hunting vary both among species and localities, these differences should be considered when attempting to derive population-density estimates for forest wildlife.

RESUME

Plusieurs animaux peuvent ajuster leurs stratégies comportementales afin de réduire les risques de prédation. Au Gabon du sud-ouest, en zone de forêt tropicale, nous avons investigué la propension des singes et des céphalophes à changer leur comportement anti-prédateur sous l'influence d'une chasse humaine. Nous avons comparé des réponses des singes et des céphalophes aux observateurs humains dans une zone où la chasse est interdite, à celles dans une zone voisine où la pression de chasse est modérée mais variable dans l'espace. Les résultats de notre étude indiquent que les singes deviennent plus réservés lorsqu'ils sont chassés, et ne commencent leur alarmes que lorsqu'ils se trouvent à une certaine distance (typiquement > 50 m) des humains. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune différence dans la taille de groupe des singes entre les zones chassés et non chassés. En l'absence de chasse, des céphalophes arrêtent souvent leurs mouvements en réponse aux observateurs approchants, mais dans des zones où ils sont chassés, ils abandonnent cette stratégie et se sauvent rapidement quand des humains approchent. De plus, les céphalophes sifflent le plus souvent dans les zones où ils sont chassés. Nos résultats ont au moins deux implications importantes. Premièrement, les observations du comportement des singes et des céphalophes peuvent être utiles pour estimer l'intensité de chasse locale dans des forêts tropicales d'Afrique. Deuxièmement, la chance de surestimation des densités de céphalophes est plus élevée dans les zones avec de la chasse, où ils sont plus enclin à se sauver en sifflant, alors que la chance de sous-estimation est plus élevée dans des zones sans chasse, où ils restent immobile afin d'éviter la détection. Puisque les adaptations comportementales à la chasse varient entre espèces et localités, ces différences devraient être considérées lorsqu'on souhaite calculer la densité de la faune en milieu forestier.

Ancillary