Social Immunity in Amphibians: Evidence for Vertical Transmission of Innate Defenses

Authors

  • Jenifer B. Walke,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Reid N. Harris,

    1. Department of Biology, James Madison University, MSC 7801, Harrisonburg, Virginia 22807, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Laura K. Reinert,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2363, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Louise A. Rollins-Smith,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2363, U.S.A.
    2. Departments of Pediatrics and of Biological Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-2363, U.S.A.
    3. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panamá, Republic of Panamá
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Douglas C. Woodhams

    1. Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panamá, Republic of Panamá
    2. Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstasse 190, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland
    Search for more papers by this author

ABSTRACT

Amphibian embryos are at risk of microbial infection. Here we find evidence that innate immune defenses, both antimicrobial skin peptides and mutualistic microbiota, of adult glass frogs, Hyalinobatrachium colymbiphyllum, can be transmitted to embryos deposited on leaves above rain forest streams in Panama and can inhibit the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

Abstract in Spanish is available at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/btp.

Ancillary