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Overexpression of SGR Results in Oxidative Stress and Lesion-mimic Cell Death in Rice Seedlings

Authors

  • Huawu Jiang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
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  • Yaping Chen,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
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  • Meiru Li,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
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  • Xinglan Xu,

    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
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  • Guojiang Wu

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, China
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Corresponding author
Tel: +86 20 3725 2703; Fax: +86 20 3725 2831; E-mail: wugj@scbg.ac.cn.

Abstract

It is thought that the Stay Green Rice (SGR) gene is involved in the disaggregation of the light harvesting complex and in the subsequent breakdown of chlorophyll and apo-protein during senescence. In this study, we found that overexpression of SGR (Ov-SGR) resulted in the generation of singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species and produced a chlorophyll-dependent regional cell death phenotype on leaves of rice seedlings. Transcriptome analyses using Affymetrix Rice GeneChips revealed that Ov-SGR rice seedlings exhibited a number of signs of singlet oxygen response. The genes and their associated biochemical pathways identified provide an insight into how rice plants respond to singlet oxygen at the molecular and physiologic level.

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