ROLE OF INITIAL MUSCLE pH ON THE SOLUBILITY OF FISH MUSCLE PROTEINS IN WATER

Authors

  • STEPHEN D. KELLEHER,

    1. Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Food Science University of Massachusetts/Amherst Marine Station, Gloucester, MA 01930
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    • 1

      Proteus Industries, Gloucester, MA 01930

  • YUMING FENG,

    1. Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Food Science University of Massachusetts/Amherst Marine Station, Gloucester, MA 01930
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      Campbell Soup Company, Camden, NJ 08103

  • HERBERT O. HULTIN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Food Science University of Massachusetts/Amherst Marine Station, Gloucester, MA 01930
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  • MARY BETH LIVINGSTON

    1. Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station Department of Food Science University of Massachusetts/Amherst Marine Station, Gloucester, MA 01930
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    • 3

      Gorton's of Gloucester, Gloucester, MA 01930


  • This study was supported by the Cooperative State Research, Extension, Education Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, under Project MAS 00759.

4 Corresponding author. University of Massachusetts Marine Station, P.O. Box 7128, Gloucester, MA 01930. FAX: (978) 281-2618. EMAIL: marinest@foodsci.umass.edu

Abstract

The solubility of the myofibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins in water was determined for the muscle tissue often species offish. The flesh of six white-muscled fish had pH's at the time of processing above pH 6.6 and greater than 80% of their myofibrillar/cytoskeletal proteins were soluble in water. The flesh of three pelagic species and a shark had pH values when processed below 6.6 and the water solubility of their myofibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins was less than 40%. When the washed minced muscle of one of the white-fleshed species, cod, was exposed to low pH, the solubility of its myofibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins decreased substantially. The water solubility of the cod myofibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins could be reestablished by washing the acid-treated cod flesh with neutral salt solutions. It is suggested that pH values below 6.6 modify certain proteins which prevent the water-extractability of the rest of the myofibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins from being expressed.

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