MILK FAT GLOBULE SIZE, POWDER HYDRATION TIME, PARA-κ-CASEIN CONTENT AND TEXTURAL PROPERTIES OF RECOMBINED WHITE-BRINED CHEESE PRODUCED BY DIRECT RECOMBINATION SYSTEM

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

In this study, effects of milk fat globule size, aging and the amount of para-κ-casein on textural properties of white-brined cheese during a ripening period of 30 days were investigated. The cheese was produced from a cheese base containing approximately 40% total solids, 14% protein and 16.5% milk fat. Cheese base was mixed with a laboratory scale mixer and/or homogenized at different pressures (5 and 10 MPa) to provide different milk fat globule sizes. Different batches of cheese bases were renneted after having been aged for 0, 8, 16 and 24 h at 4C. Cheeses bases were renneted at different temperatures (10, 20 or 30C) to ensure different amounts of para-κ-casein on coagulation. Results showed that textural properties of the experimental cheese deteriorated with decreasing milk fat globule size, and cheese became softer and more fragile. However, aging the cheese base for 8 h improved textural properties. Although lowering the renneting temperature increased the amount o f para-κ-casein content of cheese base before gelation was achieved, this procedure also failed to improve textural properties of the experimental cheeses. This study indicates the importance of the process variables explored to understanding changes in and improving textural properties of recombined white-brined cheese.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

The direct recombination system could be employed for making cheese in countries where milk supply and/or water are limited. It has an advantage of requiring less water for reconstitution of milk powders than an ordinary reconstitution process. Because whey proteins are retained in cheese curd, cheese made by this technique could be considered as more nutritious. As limited syneresis occurs with this technique, less damage is made to the environment. Widespread use of this technique will potentially increase the international trade of powders high in protein and low in lactose.

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