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STABILITY OF IRON-FORTIFIED GARI DURING STORAGE IN DIFFERENT PACKAGING MATERIALS

Authors

  • S.A. SANNI

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University of Agriculture, PMB 2240, Abeokuta 110001, Nigeria
      TEL: +2347035234820; EMAIL: silajok@yahoo.com
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TEL: +2347035234820; EMAIL: silajok@yahoo.com

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Gari – a West African staple food, was fortified with 25, 35 and 45 mg/kg iron sulfate, iron fumarate and sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA), respectively. The fortified gari samples were packed in high-density zip-lock polyethylene bags and plastic jars and stored at ambient temperatures (30 ± 2C). Changes in moisture, iron, pH and peak viscosity of the fortified gari were monitored under storage for 5 months. Samples were analyzed monthly during storage using standard analytical procedures. High-density zip-lock polyethylene bags showed better protective barrier than plastic jar. Moisture content and peak viscosity decreased as storage time increased while pH increased. The iron in gari stored inside high-density zip-lock polyethylene bag was less susceptible to oxidation, hence, low losses in iron after 5 months of storage. NaFeEDTA-fortified gari packed inside high-density zip-lock polyethylene bags was the most stable during storage compared with iron sulfate and iron fumarate.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

Successful iron fortification and ensuring storage stability of fortified local diet will be a good nutritional intervention in sub-Saharan African countries. The problem of poor keeping quality of many dehydrated foods in the tropics is related to their moisture uptake during merchandising, perhaps due to poor packaging materials and the levels of moisture at which they were prepared. Scientific information on the storage stability of iron-fortified gari will be of vital importance to nutritional interventions targeted at alleviating iron deficiency anemia especially among the low-income earners in sub-Saharan Africa.

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