A SURVEY OF THE PREVALENCE OF SALMONELLA AND OTHER ENTERIC PATHOGENS IN A COMMERCIAL POULTRY FEED MILL

Authors

  • PAUL WHYTE,

    Corresponding author
    1. Food Hygiene Laboratory Department of Large Animal Clinical Studies Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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  • KEVINA McGILL,

    1. Food Hygiene Laboratory Department of Large Animal Clinical Studies Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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  • JOHN DANIEL COLLINS

    1. Food Hygiene Laboratory Department of Large Animal Clinical Studies Faculty of Veterinary Medicine University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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1 To whom all correspondence should be addressed. TEL: +353-1-7166074; FAX: +353-1-7166091; E-mail: paul.whyte@ucd.ie

ABSTRACT

A study of the prevalences of Salmonella, Listeria and thermophilic campylobacters in a dedicated commercial poultry feed mill was undertaken. Salmonella was frequently recovered in samples taken in the preheat and postheat treatment areas of the mill with the overall percentage of samples positive found to be 18.8% and 22.6%, respectively. Feed ingredients and dust collected in the preheat treatment locations within the mill were frequently contaminated with Salmonella (11.8% and 33.3% of samples, respectively). High prevalences of Salmonella were also detected in dust samples (24.2%) obtained from the postheat treatment area of the mill and from feed delivery vehicles (57.1%).

Listeria was also recovered from samples at pre- and postheat treatment areas within the mill with overall isolation rates of 14.1% and 18.5% observed, respectively. The most frequently observed species of Listeria recovered from samples in both areas within the mill was L. innocua, L. monocytogenes, L. grayi and L. welshimeri.

No thermophilic campylobacters were recovered from any of the samples analyzed in the current study.

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