COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF STANDARD CULTURE AND REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION TO DETECT CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI IN RETAIL CHICKEN SAMPLES

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Contamination of poultry by Campylobacter is a significant source of human diarrheal illness. The purpose of this study was to compare standard culture-based methods and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of Campylobacter jejuni from retail chicken samples. Culture methods were compared with RT-PCR (without enrichment) for detection of C. jejuni in naturally contaminated chicken samples. Purchased chicken samples (n = 43) were collected from four supermarkets. C. jejuni was detected by direct plating to selective agar (DPSA; 5/43, 11.6%), RT-PCR (15/43, 34.9%) and Bolton's enrichment (BE; 8/43, 41.9%). Fifteen chicken samples were concordant by RT-PCR and BE whereas three samples were positive only by BE. The sensitivity of the RT-PCR and DPSA, when compared to BE as the reference standard (100% sensitivity) were 81 and 29%, respectively. Application of rapid and sensitive methods for detection and enumeration of C. jejuni is important for the maintenance of a safe poultry supply.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

Campylobacter spp are one of the most common causes of bacterial diarrheal disease worldwide. This zoonotic pathogen is reported to have a low infective dose with high pathogenicity. The practical application of the experiment is directed to assess the “standard culture-based methods and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)” to detect Campylobacter jejuni, which is most commonly isolated campylobacter species from clinical infections and chicken samples. Because of the growth characteristics and difficulty of routine diagnostic technique, evaluation of food samples for the presence of C. jejuni can be challenging.

The main focus of the study is to assess the sensitivity and sensitivity of culture and RT-PCR. The results are instrumental resources in the area of food safety, epidemiological surveillance, policy development to monitor and regulate the food matrices and diagnostic laboratories. The audiences of this information will be both academic and commercial sectors involved in poultry production and processing institutions, food regulatory and inspection institutions, risk assessment and also the consumer.

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