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REDUCTIONS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, COLIFORMS, AEROBIC PLATE COUNTS AND CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI BY A SMALL-SCALE, HIGH-PRESSURE SYSTEM DEVISED TO CLEAN A MINIATURIZED POULTRY GIBLETS TRANSPORT SYSTEM

Authors


O.A. Oyarzabal, Department of Biological Sciences, 1627 Hall Street, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL. TEL: +334-229-8449; FAX: 334-229-6709; EMAIL: oaoyarzabal@gmail.com

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The efficacy of using direct high-pressure hot water (60C, 140F) and a quaternary ammonium compound to clean the inside of stainless steel pipe used to transport chicken giblets was evaluated. The giblets were collected from a commercial processing plant and were inoculated with Campylobacter jejuni. The cleaning system was effective in reducing the numbers of inoculated C. jejuni and naturally occurring mesotrophic bacteria (aerobic plate counts) on the inside surface of the stainless steel pipe used to transport the giblets. However, the decreases in naturally occurring Escherichia coli and coliforms were not significant. These results suggest that additional improvements are needed to better disinfect the piping system used to transport giblets to reduce the potential for cross-contamination with C. jejuni and E. coli. The devised cleaning system could be optimized to reduce the use of chemical agents, the cleaning time and the cost of cleaning pipes in poultry processing facilities.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

These experiments suggest that the traditional use of hot water and quaternary ammonium compounds to clean the inside of the piping system used to transport chicken giblets may not be sufficient to reduce the contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and mesotrophic bacteria (aerobic plate count). Poultry processors should be aware of the limitations of cleaning closed piping systems and develop and test high-pressure systems to thoroughly clean the pipes used to transport giblets after processing to avoid potential sources of cross-contamination with C. jejuni and mesotrophic bacteria.

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