A COMPARISON OF BASIC TASTE MODALITIES, USING A DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE, FOR VARYING LEVELS OF SODIUM AND KCl IN TWO MODEL SOUP SYSTEMS

Authors

  • S. HOOGE,

    Corresponding author
    1. General Mills, Inc. 9000 Plymouth Ave N.
      Golden Valley, MN 55427
    2. Sensory Analysis Center
      Kansas State University
      Justin Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506
      TEL: +1763 7646102; FAX: +1-763-764-6102; EMAIL: susan.hooge@genmills.com
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  • D. CHAMBERS

    1. Sensory Analysis Center
      Kansas State University
      Justin Hall, Manhattan, KS 66506
    Search for more papers by this author

TEL: +1763 7646102; FAX: +1-763-764-6102; EMAIL: susan.hooge@genmills.com

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This study examined the basic taste intensities in samples with varying levels of sodium and potassium chloride (KCl) in model soup systems in order to understand the impact of sodium reduction and KCl addition. Understanding the impact of different sodium and KCl levels may give insight into the potential interaction of KCl on the perceived saltiness of NaCl and a better understanding of the degree to which KCl can be used in reducing sodium without adversely affecting the basic taste sensory properties.

These results suggest that a 48% sodium reduction is possible in chicken broth and tomato soup with the addition of 0.6 or 0.75% KCl and 0, 0.45, 0.6, or 0.75% KCl, respectively, without significant impact to basic taste sensory perceptions.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

KCl in literature is described as bitter or metallic, and these attributes are considered limiting to KCl's potential as a sodium chloride replacement. This research shows that there is potential to reduce sodium by close to 50% with KCl without significantly impacting the saltiness or bitterness intensity in tomato soup or chicken broth. Higher sodium reductions with KCl additions may be possible in other food systems, resulting in acceptable flavor with a healthier nutrition profile.

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