EFFECT OF HYDROCOLLOIDS AND VISCOSITY ON FLAVOR AND ODOR INTENSITIES OF AROMATIC FLAVOR COMPOUNDS

Authors


  • *Based on research conducted at the University of California and supported in part by General Foods Corporation.

Abstract

Abstract. This study was undertaken to determine the flavor- and odor-modifying effects of low concentrations of five selected food hydrocolloids (hydroxypropylcellulose, sodium alginate, xanthan, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose of low and medium viscosity types) on typical flavor compounds. The flavorants, representing polar/non-polar and low/high boiling compounds, were: acetaldehyde, acetophenone, butyric acid and dimethyl sulfide. Their effects on both oral and Brookfield viscosities were also measured.

Only one flavorant had a significant and consistent effect on viscosity of the hydrocolloids; butyric acid reduced both physical and oral viscosity, primarily of CMC-M, sodium alginate and xanthan gums. This was similar to the previously reported effect of citric acid (J. Texture Studies4, 224, 1973).

In general, addition of hydrocolloids decreased both the odor and the flavor intensities, with dimethyl sulfide being affected the most and acetophenone the least. The flavor of butyric acid was affected by more hydrocolloids than was its odor. Acetaldehyde represented an interesting case in that the general effect of the hydrocolloids was to reduce its odor but to increase its flavor. Overall, the effects were independent of viscosity and specific for the gum/odorant combination. A relationship may be postulated between the physico-chemical nature of the odorant and the frequency/intensity of the observed effects.

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