Well Location in Capture Zone Design Using Simulation and Optimization Techniques

Authors

  • David P. Ahlfeld,

    1. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, and Graduate Research Assistant, respectively, Environmental Research Institute, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269.
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  • Charles S. Sawyer

    1. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, and Graduate Research Assistant, respectively, Environmental Research Institute, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269.
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  • Discussion open until January 1, 1991.

  • David Ahlfeld received a B.S. degree in Environmental Resources Engineering from Humbolt State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University in Civil Engineering. He currently holds an Assistant Professor appointment with the Environmental Research Institute and the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Connecticut. His research interests include fate and transport processes for contaminant transport in ground water, simulation modeling of ground-water flow and transport, and remediation and monitoring network design.

  • Charles S. Sawyer received a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Sierra Leone, and an M.S. in Chemical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He has had experience in the petroleum industry. He is currently a candidate for the Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Connecticut. His research focuses on ground-water modeling.

Abstract

A new computational methodology for capture zone design for contaminated ground-water remediation is described. This method has been implemented in a computer model which utilizes both simulation and optimization techniques. The procedure determines the well locations and pump rates which will produce a desired ground-water flow field at minimum cost. In this paper, the design procedure is described along with an example of its use on a hypothetical aquifer system. Numerical experiments are presented which determine the effect on remediation cost of alternate well locations. It is found that different well locations can have a major impact on the overall cost of remediation.

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