Analysis of Ground-Water Remedial Alternatives at a Superfund Site

Authors

  • C. Zheng,

    1. S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc., 12250 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852.
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    • Chunrniao Zheng has been a Research Hydrogeologist with S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. since 1988. He received his B.S. in Geology from Chengdu College of Geology in China and his Ph.D. in Hydrogeology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current research interests focus on the development of numerical techniques for field applications.

  • G. D. Bennett,

    1. S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc., 12250 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852.
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    • Gordon Bennett received his B.S. in Geology from the University of Notre Dame and his M.S. in Geophysics from the Pennsylvania State University. He has been active in the field of ground water for 35 years, including 30 years with the USGS and US AID, and five years in hydrogeologic consulting. His interests have included regional hydrogeology, well hydraulics, salt-water/fresh-water relationships, and simulation techniques. He is presently a Senior Associate with S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc.

  • C. B. Andrews

    1. S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc., 12250 Rockville Pike, Rockville, Maryland 20852.
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    • Charles Andrews is Vice President of S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc. He received his B.A. degree in Geology from Carleton College and his Ph.D. degree in Geology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was a Staff Scientist with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe from 1978 to 1980, and was a Project Hydrogeologist with Woodward-Clyde Consultants from 1980 to 1984. His research interests are in the area of applying ground-water models to practical problems.


  • Discussion open until May 1, 1992.

Abstract

This paper presents a simple yet effective approach and methodology for the problem of evaluating ground-water remedial alternatives at a waste disposal site, and discusses the application of this approach in a case study. The attainment areas, which represent the areas (outside the contaminant source itself) in which remediation is required, are first identified. Simulation of ground-water flow in three dimensions, augmented by fluid particle tracking, is utilized to evaluate the travel times of ground water through the attainment areas. The mixed linear reservoir or “batch flush” model is then used to estimate the number of pore volumes which must be flushed through each attainment area in order to achieve remediation. The travel times are used in conjunction with this pore volume figure to estimate the time required for cleanup under each alternative. By comparing the cleanup time, the costs, and other features of each alternative, a cost-effective remedy for the study site can be determined. While the development of remedial alternatives and the choice of the most cost-effective remedy are highly site-specific, the approach and methodology outlined in this paper have general applicability. The results presented herein also provide insight into the difficulties and special considerations associated with modeling and analyzing remedial alternatives.

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