Multilevel Slug Tests with Comparisons to Tracer Data

Authors

  • Joel G. Melville,

    1. Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5337.
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    • Joel G. Melville obtained his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Pennsylvania State University, and his M.S. degree from the University of Texas at Austin in Engineering Mechanics. Since receiving his Ph.D. degree in 1972, he has held research and faculty positions at the University of Iowa and the University of Florida. He is currently an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at Auburn University. His principal research interest is ground-water hydraulics.

  • Fred J. Molz,

    1. Huff Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5337.
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    • Fred J. Molz holds the position of Huff Professor with the Civil Engineering Department at Auburn University. He came to Auburn in 1970 after receiving his Ph.D. in Hydrology from Stanford University. Prior degrees in Physics and Civil Engineering were obtainedat Drexel University. Much of hispast research involved theoreticaland experimental studies of heat and contaminant transport in aquifers. His current interests deal with measurement of vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity and mathematical modeling of aquifer transport processes involving biological activity.

  • Oktay Güven,

    1. Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Alabama 36849-5337.
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    • Oktay Given is currently a Professor of Civil Engineering at Auburn University. He obtained his B.S. degree in Civil Engineer-ingfrom Robert College (Istanbul, Turkey) in 1968, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanics and Hydraulics from the University of Iowa in 1970 and 1975, respectively. He worked as a Research Assistant, and as an Assistant Research Scientist at the Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research, and he held faculty positions at the Middle East Technical University (Ankara, Turkey) and at the Technical University in Istanbul before joining the Department of Civil Engineering at Auburn University in 1981. His principal research interests are in the areas of hydraulics, hydrology, numerical analysis and contaminant transport in the subsurface environment.

  • Mark A. Widdowson

    1. Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208.
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    • Mark A. Widdowson holds theposition ofAssistant Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of South Carolina. He obtained his B.S.C.E. from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the LJniversity of Cincinnati in 1982 and his M.S. from the University of Kansas in 1984. He received his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from Auburn University in 1987 and later served as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Auburn. He currently teaches courses in subsurface contaminant transport, ground-water hydraulics, and undergraduate fluid mechanics. His research interests include ground-water hydraulics and field techniques for determining hydraulic conductivity, and development of numerical models for describing contaminant transport coupled to biodegradation and numerical methods.


  • Discussion open until May 1, 1992.

Abstract

Multilevel slug tests were conducted in a confined, granular aquifer near Mobile, Alabama. Tracer injection and travel time experiments, more direct measurements of transport in the aquifer, were also conducted at the same location. The objective was to compare results of the two field investigations to ascertain the accuracy and utility of slug testing to measure transport properties of the aquifer. Nondimensional hydraulic conductivity profiles inferred from the slug tests and the tracer experiments were similar. The similarity of the profiles supported the utility of multilevel slug testing to characterize the hydraulic conductivity profile in the aquifer.

The slug test data collected in three wells were interpreted using a radial flow model (Cooper et al., 1967) and a finite element model which considered both radial and vertical flow (Widdowson et al., 1989, 1990). Hydraulic conductivity values inferred from the measured data considering both radial and vertical flow were approximately two-thirds of the values inferred assuming radial flow.

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