A Comparison of Sorption Coefficients Determined by Batch, Column, and Box Methods on a Low Organic Carbon Aquifer Material

Authors

  • William G. Maclntyre,

    1. Professor, College of William and Mary, School of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, Virginia 23062.
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    • William MacIntyre is a Professor of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary. He received a Ph.D. (1965) from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Research interests include: ground-water contaminant transport, ground-water flux into estuaries, chemistry of herbicides, and physical chemistry of aqueous solutions of organic chemical mixtures.

  • Thomas B. Stauffer,

    1. Chief, Subsurface Chemical Processes Group, Headquarters Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida 32403.
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    • Thomas Stauffer is Chief of the Subsurface Chemical Process Group at the Air Force Engineering and Services Center. He received a Ph.D. (1987) in Marine Science from the College of William and Mary. His research interests include the environ-mental fate of complex hydrocarbon mixtures, solute transport in ground water, and the analytical chemistry of fuels and solvents.

  • Christopher P. Antworth

    1. Research Chemist, Headquarters Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida 32403.
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    • Christopher Antworth is a Research Chemist at the Air Force Engineering and Services Center. He received a B.S. (1980) in Chemistry from Florida State University. He is interested in solute/surface interactions and their role in ground-water transport of organic chemicals, analytical separations of priority pollutants, and biodegradation of surfactants and hydrocarbon mixtures.


  • Discussion open until May 1, 1992.

Abstract

Results of three independent experimental methods for determination of sorption coefficients were compared on sieved aquifer material samples from Columbus AFB, Columbus, Mississippi. These aquifer materials contained <0.1% organiccarbon, and sorption coefficients for naphthalene ranged from 0.06 to 0.20 I/kg. There was low correlation between organic carbon contents and sorption coefficients. Good agreement was found among sorption coefficients measured by batch, dynamic column, and dynamic box methods. Similarity of the coefficients was attributed to measured fast sorption kinetics and to linearity of isotherms observed for naphthalene sorption on Columbus aquifer material. Results indicate that channeling, wall and end effects, and particle loss were insignificant in the dynamic systems. Since laboratory sorption coefficient measurements were found impractical on whole sand-gravel aquifer samples, an equation is proposed to convert laboratory measured sorption coefficients on the separated sand (<2 mm) fraction to sorption coefficients on wholesand-gravel aquifer materials.

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