Consumers’ Protection of Online Privacy and Identity

Authors

  • GEORGE R. MILNE,

    1. George R. Milne is an associate professor of marketing at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (milne@mktg.umass.edu), and Shalini Bahl is a doctoral candidate at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (sbahl@som.umass.edu). Andrew J. Rohm is an assistant professor of marketing at Northeastern University (a.rohm@neu.edu).
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  • ANDREW J. ROHM,

    1. George R. Milne is an associate professor of marketing at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (milne@mktg.umass.edu), and Shalini Bahl is a doctoral candidate at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (sbahl@som.umass.edu). Andrew J. Rohm is an assistant professor of marketing at Northeastern University (a.rohm@neu.edu).
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  • SHALINI BAHL

    1. George R. Milne is an associate professor of marketing at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (milne@mktg.umass.edu), and Shalini Bahl is a doctoral candidate at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst (sbahl@som.umass.edu). Andrew J. Rohm is an assistant professor of marketing at Northeastern University (a.rohm@neu.edu).
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Abstract

This article examines online behaviors that increase or reduce risk of online identity theft. The authors report results from three consumer surveys that indicate the propensity to protect oneself from online identity theft varies by population. The authors then examine attitudinal, behavioral, and demographic antecedents that predict the tendency to protect one's privacy and identity online. Implications and suggestions for managers, public policy makers, and consumers related to protecting online privacy and identity theft are provided.

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