Roles of secreted frizzled-related proteins in cancer1

Authors

  • Yihui SHI,

    1. Thoracic Oncology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
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    • 4

      SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025 USAs

  • Biao HE,

    1. Thoracic Oncology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
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  • Liang YOU,

    1. Thoracic Oncology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
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  • David M JABLONS

    Corresponding author
    1. Thoracic Oncology Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
      3 Correspondence to Prof David M JABLONS. Phn 1-415-353-7502. Fax 1-415-502-3179. Email jablonsd@surgery.ucsf.edu
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  • 1

    This work was partially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (RO1 CA 093708-01A3), the Larry Hall and Zygielbaum Memorial Trust, and the Kazan, McClain, Edises, Abrams, Fernandez, Lyons & Farrise Foundation.

3 Correspondence to Prof David M JABLONS. Phn 1-415-353-7502. Fax 1-415-502-3179. Email jablonsd@surgery.ucsf.edu

Abstract

The Wnt signaling pathway is implicated in a variety of biological processes ranging from developmental cell fate to human disease. The components involved in Wnt signaling have been under intense investigation over the last 2 decades. Aberrant canonical Wnt activation has been linked to tumor formation and involves activation of effector molecules or loss of tumor suppressor function. Secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs) are Wnt antagonists. In recent years, accumulating evidence has suggested that sFRPs act as tumor suppressors because their expression is frequently silenced in cancer by promoter hypermethylation. However, sFRPs may also promote cell growth in some contexts. Here, we focus on the known knowledge of sFRPs in tumorigenesis.

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