NDRG2: a Myc-repressed gene involved in cancer and cell stress

Authors

  • Libo Yao,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Institute of Molecular Biology and the State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China
      *Corresponding author: Tel, 86-29-84774513; Fax, 86-29-84774513; E-mail, bioyao@fmmu.edu.cn
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  • Jian Zhang,

    1. The Institute of Molecular Biology and the State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China
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  • Xuewu Liu

    1. The Institute of Molecular Biology and the State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an 710032, China
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  • This work was supported by grants from the Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in Universities of China (No. PCSIRT0459) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 30228012, 30370315, 30570676, 30670452, 30700416 and 06G092)

*Corresponding author: Tel, 86-29-84774513; Fax, 86-29-84774513; E-mail, bioyao@fmmu.edu.cn

Abstract

As a master switch for cell proliferation and differentiation, Myc exerts its biological functions mainly through transcrip-tional regulation of its target genes, which are involved in cells' interaction and communication with their external environment. The N-Myc downstream-regulated gene (NDRG) family is composed of NDRG1, NDRG2, NDRG3 and NDRG4, which are important in cell proliferation and differentiation. This review summarizes the recent studies on the structure, tissue distribution and functions of NDRG2 that try to show its significance in studying cancer and its therapeutic potential.

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