Coronary heart disease knowledge tool for women

Authors

  • Joanne L. Thanavaro DNP, ANP-BC, ACNP-BC, DCC (Associate Professor, Coordinator of Adult Nurse Practitioner Program),

    Corresponding author
    1. St. Louis University School of Nursing, St. Louis, Missouri
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  • Samer Thanavaro MD, FACC (Invasive Interventional Cardiologist),

    1. Christian Northeast Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri
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  • Timothy Delicath PhD (Associate Director of Academic Affairs for the School of Advanced Studies)

    1. Phoenix University, Phoenix, Arizona
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Joanne L. Thanavaro, DNP, ANP-BC, ACNP-BC, DCC, St. Louis University School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Avenue, Room 321, St. Louis, MO 63104.
Tel: 314-977-8993;
Fax: 314-977-8840;
E-mail: jthanava@slu.edu

Abstract

Purpose: To develop a tool that measures coronary heart disease (CHD) knowledge specifically for women.

Data sources: The new CHD knowledge tool, based on previous surveys of women's CHD knowledge, has 25 multiple-choice questions. An expert panel evaluated content and face validity. The tool was pilot tested in women without CHD, who were admitted to a Chest Pain Center. The tool was subsequently administered to laywomen and female cardiovascular nurses to evaluate its validity and reliability. The sample included 49 women as the control group (Group 1), 23 cardiovascular nurses as a known group (Group 2), and 22 women with an educational program as the treatment group (Group 3). Knowledge of women in Group 1 was compared with Groups 2 and 3 in known group and predictive validity tests.

Conclusion: The new tool demonstrates good validity and reliability to measure CHD knowledge in women.

Implications for practice: Women continue to have low CHD knowledge, and nurse practitioners should provide education to improve women's CHD knowledge as a strategy to promote healthy lifestyle practices and CHD risk prevention. The new tool can be utilized in future research to measure women's CHD knowledge.

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