Land degradation: A global perspective

Authors

  • Arthur Conacher

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia
      Arthur Conacher holds an MA (Hons) degree from The University of Auckland and a DSc from the University of Western Australia, where he is a Senior Honorary Research Fellow in Geography. For 10 years, until 2006, he was Secretary of the International Geographical Union's Commission on Land Degradation and Desertification.
      E-mail: arthur.conacher@uwa.edu.au
    Search for more papers by this author

Arthur Conacher holds an MA (Hons) degree from The University of Auckland and a DSc from the University of Western Australia, where he is a Senior Honorary Research Fellow in Geography. For 10 years, until 2006, he was Secretary of the International Geographical Union's Commission on Land Degradation and Desertification.
E-mail: arthur.conacher@uwa.edu.au

Abstract

Land degradation has a long history and is on the increase. It has adverse consequences for people's economies, health and well-being, and for ecosystems, and it is causally linked to population growth and inappropriate land-use practices. It is an urban as well as a rural problem. Solutions require an integrated, geographical approach. Otherwise, some problems may be ignored and others created inadvertently.

Ancillary