CRIMINAL JUSTICE PLANNING

An Alternative Model

Authors

  • RICHARD A. SMITH,

    1. Florida State University
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    • Richard A. Smith is an Associate Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Florida State University; he serves as codirector of the University's Graduate Program in Criminal Justice Planning. He has consulted extensively with state and local governments on the criminal, justice planning process.

  • RICHARD E. KLOSTERMAN

    1. Florida State University
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    • Richard E. Klosterman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Florida Slate University He has served as assistant director of the Southeastern Institute for Criminal Justice Planning and Evaluation and as an instructor with the Institute's criminal justice training program.


Abstract

Academic and practicing criminal justice planners have generally assumed the utility of a particular model of planning. This model, the general planning process model, proceeds in a strict sequence of problem analysis, goal identification, alternative analysis, program selection, implementation, and evaluation. While this approach has proven useful in other areas such as corporate and military planning many of the fundamental assumptions underlying its use are not satisfied in the criminal justice field. Criminal justice planners have generally attempted to modify the field to match the assumptions of their planning approach. hut they have had little success in doing so. An alternative model exists, however, which suggests that planning ought to he restricted, concurrent, and fragmented. This approach not only adapts planning to the present characteristics of the criminal, justice field hut also helps deal with some of the fields most troublesome characteristics.

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