SOCIAL DISORGANIZATION AND THEORIES OF CRIME AND DELINQUENCY: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS*

Authors


  • *

    This paper is a greatly revised version of one presented at the 1984 annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Cincinnati. The author would like to acknowledge the very helpful comments and criticisms of Mitch Chamlin, Harold Grasmick, Janet Heitgerd, Charles Tittle, Kirk Williams, and three anonymous reviewers of an earlier draft. This work has been supported in part by grant 84-IJ-CX-0071, awarded by the National Institute of Justice.

  • Robert J. Bursik, Jr. is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Oklahoma. He and Harold Grasmick are currently involved in a longitudinal study of neighborhood crime rates in Oklahoma City.

Abstract

After a period of decline in the discipline, the social disorganization model of Shaw and McKay is again beginning to appear in the literature. This paper examines five criticisms of the perspective and discusses recent attempts to address those issues and problems that are still in need of resolution.

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