Effects of the Bogus-Pipeline on Enhancing Validity of Self-Reported Adolescent Drug Use Measures

Authors

  • Chudley E. Werch,

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      ChudleY E. Werch, PhD, Assistant Professor, Health Education; Dean R. Gorman, PhD, Associate Professor, Physical Education; Phillip J. Marty, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Education; Janet Forbess, MA, Instructor, Physical Education; and Barry Brown, PhD, Professor, Physical Education, HP 308, University of Arkansas, FaYetteville, AR 72701.

  • Dean R. Gorman,

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      ChudleY E. Werch, PhD, Assistant Professor, Health Education; Dean R. Gorman, PhD, Associate Professor, Physical Education; Phillip J. Marty, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Education; Janet Forbess, MA, Instructor, Physical Education; and Barry Brown, PhD, Professor, Physical Education, HP 308, University of Arkansas, FaYetteville, AR 72701.

  • Phillip J. Marty,

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      ChudleY E. Werch, PhD, Assistant Professor, Health Education; Dean R. Gorman, PhD, Associate Professor, Physical Education; Phillip J. Marty, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Education; Janet Forbess, MA, Instructor, Physical Education; and Barry Brown, PhD, Professor, Physical Education, HP 308, University of Arkansas, FaYetteville, AR 72701.

  • Janet Forbess,

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      ChudleY E. Werch, PhD, Assistant Professor, Health Education; Dean R. Gorman, PhD, Associate Professor, Physical Education; Phillip J. Marty, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Education; Janet Forbess, MA, Instructor, Physical Education; and Barry Brown, PhD, Professor, Physical Education, HP 308, University of Arkansas, FaYetteville, AR 72701.

  • Barry Brown

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      ChudleY E. Werch, PhD, Assistant Professor, Health Education; Dean R. Gorman, PhD, Associate Professor, Physical Education; Phillip J. Marty, PhD, Associate Professor, Health Education; Janet Forbess, MA, Instructor, Physical Education; and Barry Brown, PhD, Professor, Physical Education, HP 308, University of Arkansas, FaYetteville, AR 72701.


Abstract

ABSTRACT: This study examined effects of a bogus objective measure (bogus-pipeline) on self-reports of experimenta-tion, frequency, intentions, beliefs, and attitudes related to alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use. One hundred ninety-one adolescents (x age = 11.74 years) were assigned randomly to one of three conditions: a bogus-pipeline with saliva collection, a bogus-pipeline only, or a questionnaire only control. A significantly greater percentage of participants in the questionnaire only condition (28%) reported having experimented with alcohol, compared to those in the bogus-pipeline only condition (22%), and the bogus-pipeline with saliva condition (21%). No differences were found across conditions for subject experimentation with other drugs, frequency of drug use, intentions to use drugs, and beliefs and attitudes related to drug use (p > .05). The discrepancy among studies suggesting a validity enhancing effect due to bogus-pipeline procedures and those indicating no effect may be accounted for by variables including age, experimental setting, population under study, and drug types. The broad, unquestioned application of the bogus-pipeline in tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use prevention programs, or epidemiological studies of drug use, cannot be recommended at present.

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