Teachers' Use of Health Curricula: Implementation of Growing Healthy, Project SMART, and the Teenage Health Teaching Modules

Authors

  • Dennis W. Smith PhD,

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      Dennis W. Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Health and Human Performance, 123 Melcher Gymnasium, The University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204

  • Laura K. McCormick DrPH,

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      Laura K. McCormick, DrPH, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Center for Health Promotion Research and Development, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77225

  • Allan B. Steckler DrPH,

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      Allan B. Steckler, DrPH, Professor, Dept. of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

  • Kenneth R. McLeroy PhD

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      Kenneth R. McLeroy, PhD, Associate Professor, Dept. of Public Health Education, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27411. This research was supported partially by National Cancer Institute grant #5 R01 CA 459907-02.


Abstract

ABSTRACT: This quasi-experimental study assessed impact of factors associated with classroom implementation of health curricula by North Carolina teachers. School representatives selected and implemented one of three tobacco prevention curricula — Project SMART, Growing Healthy, or the Teenage Health Teaching Modules — in either sixth or seventh grades. Prior to implementation, experimental teachers and administrators received extensive curricula training. Implementation data were collected through teacher completed checksheets and classroom observations for two time periods — initial implementation (n = 69) and maintained implementation (n = 136). While training was associated significantly with whether teachers implemented a curriculum (p < .05), other factors also were important. Variables outside of teachers' direct control, such as supportive administrators, context in which health instruction is taught, and turbulence, affected quantity and quality of curricular implementation.

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