Regeneration of dentine/pulp-like tissue using a dental pulp stem cell/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid scaffold construct in New Zealand white rabbits

Authors

  • Rania M. El-Backly,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry-Endodontics Branch, Tissue Engineering, Laboratories, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
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  • Ahmed G. Massoud,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry-Endodontics Branch, Tissue Engineering, Laboratories, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
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  • Azza M. El-Badry,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry-Endodontics Branch, Tissue Engineering, Laboratories, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
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  • Raef A. Sherif,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry-Endodontics Branch, Tissue Engineering, Laboratories, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
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  • Mona K. Marei

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry-Endodontics Branch, Tissue Engineering, Laboratories, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt
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Ms Rania M. El-Backly, 9 Al-Ekbal St., Victoria, Alexandria 21411, Egypt. Email: ranianoaman@gmail.com

Abstract

With the expanding knowledge of tooth regeneration and biological mechanisms of functional dental tissue repair, current treatment strategies are beginning to give way to evolving fields such as tissue engineering and biomimetics. Dental pulp stem cells were isolated from rabbit teeth and seeded onto scaffolds prepared from 50/50 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers using two different porogen particle sizes. These cell/scaffold constructs were then transplanted subcutaneously in the rabbits. The expanded rabbit dental pulp stem cells showed high proliferative and clonogenic capacities as well as the ability to give rise to mineralised-like tissues in vitro in culture flasks and after seeding them onto the scaffolds for 12 days. Histological evaluation of transplanted samples revealed the formation of osteodentine-like structures as well as tubular bilayered structures of vertically aligned parallel tubules resembling tubular-like dentine. Using a tissue engineering approach yielded tissues quite similar to normal dentine/pulp-like tissues that can perhaps be used later on for regenerative endodontic or operative procedures.

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