History of animal models of stroke

Authors

  • Victoria E. O'Collins,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia
    2. Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Parkville, Vic., Australia
    3. National Stroke Research Institute, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia
      Victoria E. O'Collins*, Level 7 Lance Townsend Building, Austin Health, Studley Road, Heidelberg, Vic. 3084, Australia.
      E-mail: ocollins@unimelb.edu.au
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  • Geoffrey A. Donnan,

    1. Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Parkville, Vic., Australia
    2. National Stroke Research Institute, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia
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  • David W. Howells

    1. Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia
    2. Florey Neuroscience Institutes, Parkville, Vic., Australia
    3. National Stroke Research Institute, Heidelberg, Vic., Australia
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  • Conflict of interest: None declared.

Victoria E. O'Collins*, Level 7 Lance Townsend Building, Austin Health, Studley Road, Heidelberg, Vic. 3084, Australia.
E-mail: ocollins@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Scientists tend to focus on the present and the future. But the practice of experimental stroke is not new. Here, we reflect on the changing landscape of the stroke laboratory over the past 2000-years, focusing on shifts in the rationale for undertaking experiments, the methodologies deployed and the colourful characters involved in this science.

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