Flow patterns and sediment deposition in rectangular shallow reservoirs

Authors

  • Matthieu Dufresne,

    1. ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), University of Liège (ULg), Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Present address: Matthieu Dufresne, National School for Water and Environmental Engineering (ENGEES), Fluid and Solid Mechanics Institute (IMFS), address: IMFS, 2 rue Boussingault 67000 Strasbourg, France. Email: matthieu.dufresne@engees.unistra.fr
  • Benjamin Dewals,

    Corresponding author
    • ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), University of Liège (ULg), Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sébastien Erpicum,

    1. ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), University of Liège (ULg), Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Pierre Archambeau,

    1. ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), University of Liège (ULg), Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michel Pirotton

    1. ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), University of Liège (ULg), Liège, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence

Benjamin Dewals, University of Liège (ULg), ArGEnCo department, Hydraulics in Environmental and Civil Engineering (HECE), Chemin des chevreuils, 1, bât B52/3, étage +1, 4000 Liège, Belgium. Email: b.dewals@ulg.ac.be

Abstract

This work involves the experimental investigation of flow patterns, preferential regions of deposition and trapping efficiency in rectangular shallow reservoirs. The main flow patterns that can be encountered in rectangular shallow reservoirs are described: symmetrical flows without any reattachment point (S0), asymmetrical flows with one reattachment point (A1) and asymmetrical flows with two reattachment points (A2). The influence of geometrical and hydraulic parameters on reattachment lengths is intensively investigated. A shape parameter is introduced to classify symmetrical and asymmetrical flows. For each flow pattern, the preferential regions of deposition are studied. To conclude, a number of practical recommendations are given. Reservoirs with a shape parameter lower than 6.2 limit sediment deposition. Reservoirs with a shape parameter greater than 6.8 are favourable for sediment deposition. Finally, perspectives for maximizing and minimizing deposition are given, respectively by exploiting the great trapping potential of the flow pattern A1 and the poor trapping potential of the flow pattern S0.

Ancillary